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CCC acquires first permanent home in its 59-year history



CCC acquires first permanent home in its 59-year history


SAN FRANCISCO, January 12, 2024 – CCC of San Francisco (Chinese Culture Center), a leading arts non-profit arts organization established in 1965, is thrilled to announce the acquisition of its first-ever permanent space and funding for the first phase of renovation at 667 Grant Ave in Chinatown. 


“This development marks a monumental step and investment for San Francisco and the Asian American community,” says Jenny Leung, CCC executive director. “We are excited to provide expanded spaces for the community and for the arts to thrive. This milestone is the result of collective organizing, equity and advocacy, and the community’s leadership.”

 

The acquisition of the property was supported by a $4.7 million grant secured through a competitive request for proposals process through the Mayor’s Office of Housing and Community Development (MOHCD), as part of the API Equity Fund championed by Supervisor Connie Chan, co-sponsored by President of the Board of Supervisors Aaron Peskin and then-Supervisor Gordon Mar. Assemblymember Phil Ting and Assemblymember Matt Haney additionally secured $1 million from the State of California for phase 1 renovations to transform the former empty storefront into an exhibition space, artist studio, and community gathering hub.


“The Chinese Culture Center has played a vital role in shaping our City into a unique and special place for artists, residents, and visitors,” said Mayor London Breed. “The acquisition of 667 Grant Ave through the partnership between my office and CCC stands as a testament to the community’s resilience, strength, and creativity. This new addition of CCC in Chinatown will strengthen the neighborhood as a vibrant cultural and artistic epicenter, and a dynamic space for artistic collaboration, innovation, and cultural exchange among San Franciscans and people from all over the world. San Francisco’s unwavering commitment to supporting the arts and honoring our rich diversity and heritage are vital to our values and identity, and will be crucial to all of the efforts and resources we are investing in San Francisco’s economic recovery.”


“The $30 million of API Equity Fund is about building our underserved community's strength, resilience, and cultural power,” says Supervisor Connie Chan. “This investment stabilizes services for AAPI Community organizations that often face the threat of displacement. The Chinese Culture Center's new permanent space creates a safe place for our community to express our diverse cultural identity and performing arts.”


“It has been a career objective of mine to preserve the legacy of CCC as a cultural arts treasure in Chinatown, starting with my partnership with former Director Mabel Teng and culminating with our work with Jenny Leung and Supervisor Connie Chan to create the API Equity Fund and identify a new permanent site,” said Board of Supervisors President Aaron Peskin, who represents Chinatown. “Securing the first permanent location in its 59-year history is a historic moment for CCC, but it also demonstrates the critical value of investing in non-profit acquisition and cultural preservation funds. This is a tool that we will continue to champion because we know how transformative it can be.”


The 10,000-square-foot acquisition is part of CCC’s “Museum Without Walls” initiative by engaging communities outside of the traditional bounds of gallery spaces, by inhabiting storefronts, alleyways, parks, and public spaces. The new space will expand CCC’s footprint of safe and accessible spaces that uplift underserved voices and will house an expanded international exhibition space, artist studio, and community gathering hub. 


CCC is honored to be a part of the stewardship of the building's rich legacy on historic Grant Avenue and its transformation for the future.


 

Press Coverage


 

Acknowledgements


Mayor's Office of Housing and Community Development

State of California


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